Seeing fall colors in Baltimore and beyond

By Mia White

After a relatively mild October, the leaves are just beginning to change in and around the city. Even on Gordon Plaza, the color of trees is growing warmer. Although central Maryland may not be considered a prime foliage destination, there are a number of places to visit for impressive displays. The UB Post has chosen three destinations; the first two are mostly accessible by car, but the third is easily reachable from the UB campus.

Loch Raven Reservoir, Towson

Loch Raven Drive is closed on the weekends

Loch Raven Drive is closed on the weekends

 

The area around Loch Raven Reservoir has spectacular forests with brilliant fall colors. Just a few weekends ago, the steep shores surrounding the water were bright gold. This golden color came from the Tulip Poplars, which are the tallest and straightest hardwood trees on the east coast. Most other trees were just beginning to turn, so visitors will likely still see striking hues.

Foliage below Loch Raven’s Dam

Foliage below Loch Raven’s Dam

 

Drive up from Providence Road to Loch Raven Drive. From 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, a portion of the road is closed to cars so that cyclists and pedestrians are free to enjoy the route without traffic.

Patapsco Valley State Park

The Patapsco Valley Park system is a large one, with multiple recreation areas all along the western border of the city. The areas closest to Ellicott City have a lot to offer, including a range of trails that climb the hills surrounding the river, swinging bridges, and a waterfall. Since the entire park is heavily forested, autumn is one of the best seasons to visit. The Buzzards Rock Trail in the Hilton area is a steep one, but well worth it, with stunning views up and down the valley.

For free parking, you can reach the Avalon Area by stopping at the Park n Ride off route 1-66 from I-95, and walking 100 yards down Rolling Road to the Soapstone Trail.

Green Mount Cemetery, Baltimore City

If you take the glass elevator up to the twelfth floor of the Angelos Law Center and look east, you will see a tall, dark spire in the midst of a clump of trees. Though it looks like a church, this is actually the Chapel of Green Mount Cemetery.

A ten-minute walk from UB’s campus, this 19th century landmark is worth visiting all year round, but it is especially beautiful during the fall. There are eleven species of hardwood trees within the cemetery’s sixty-eight acres, including gingkoes, which are known for their brilliant yellow hue. Enter through the southwest gate off East Oliver Street, and be sure to stop in to pick up a map with interesting burial sites for Baltimoreans Johns Hopkins, Enoch Pratt, and infamous John Wilkes Booth.

 

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